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STORIES

OF

American   Aborigines

By Aboriginal Excellence, Nov 4 2015 02:06PM



According to their own cosmology they were!


Among the indigenous tribes of the southeastern United States, living within a territory roughly defined by the borders of Georgia and South Carolina, was one, exhibiting a type of culture common to the inhabitants of the country bordering on the Gulf of Mexico east of the Mississippi river, whose members called themselves Tsoyahd, "Offspring of the Sun," otherwise known as the Yuchi.


The Yuchi, in accordance with their belief that they were the original occupants of eastern Georgia and South Carolina, have no migration legend. Their only myth of this class tells how a part of the tribe broke away from the main stock as the result of a dispute at a dance and departed westward, never to be heard of again.The following translation from the beginning of a myth, describing the way in which the tribes were distributed over the earth, shows the Yuchi concept regarding the origin of their neighbors : "Now the people had come upon the earth. The Shawnee came from above. The Creeks came from the ground. The Choctaw came from the water. The Yuchi came from the sun." In the cosmology of the Yuchi Indians of Tennessee, the Sun and the Moon were of the highest rank. Some people were consider to be above everyday Yuchi people because they were decended from the Sun himself. In his Ethnology of the Yuchi Indians, Frank Gouldsmith Speck notes:

"It should be mentioned here that at certain times since the origin there have been born individuals with a very dark shade of skin. These black- skinned Yuchi, as they are termed, are looked upon as being more closely related to Sun than the rest of the people. They are said to be his direct offspring, their mothers having become pregnant by Sun. As no particular rank is given them, however, their position is a sort of empty aristocracy. Several black- skinned Yuchi are said to be living today, but I have not been fortunate enough to see them."

Micco Lonzado Langley of the Savannah River Band of Euchee Indians (left)
Micco Lonzado Langley of the Savannah River Band of Euchee Indians (left)

By Aboriginal Excellence, Oct 31 2015 03:20PM


Baron Samedi and wife. Loa of Haitian vodou, the spirits of the dead.
Baron Samedi and wife. Loa of Haitian vodou, the spirits of the dead.

Halloween is a very old tradition, about 2,000 years old, born as Samhain among the Celts, who believed that the dead returned on November 1, and so would light bonfires, hide behind costumes, and make sacrifices to deities for protection. Druid priests would commune with the dead to divine the future.The Roman Catholic Church, unable to shut down the observance, expanded the feast of All Martyrs Day to All Saints Day and moved it from May 13 to November 1. Begun as a religious observance, with Christian religion co-opting pagan religion, Halloween is now the second most commercial holiday in terms of money spent, behind only Christmas, another holiday syncretized by the Roman Catholic Church with pagan rituals and gone more commercial than sacred in modern times.


The Day of the Dead is half again older than Halloween and a tradition #indigenous to the Americas. The observance of the return of the dead once occupied the entire month of August, but the Roman Catholic Church was able to squeeze it into November 2 and 3, to coincide with All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day, the latter being the closest in concept to El Dia de los Muertos(The Day Of The Dead), because on that day the devout are tasked to pray for the souls of the dead.The indigenous observance remains around a home altar, the offrenda, where the spirits of dead children,angelitos, visit with their families for 24 hours on November 1, and are welcomed with sweets and toys. On November 2, the adult dead are offered tobacco and alcoholic beverages. The living move the party to cemeteries, where they clean the graves and leave flowers to the tune of music. The Vodou festival of Fete Gede is the religion’s version of Day of the Dead also taking place on Novemeber 2. Rituals are done in the capital of Haiti's largest cemetery to honor Baron Samedi where the people bring him offereings involving candles, bottles of rum and flowers.


Halloween was born out of fear, however, the indigenous American tradition was born of celebration, a reunion with those who have walked on, and recognition of death as part of a natural cycle, nothing to be feared. The tradition is much older than the #Aztec Empire, which is where the Spanish found it.



By Aboriginal Excellence, Oct 12 2015 09:15PM

Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan photo by: Ronice Bey
Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan photo by: Ronice Bey
@CeoKingJames and J.Cole photo credit: Ronica Bey
@CeoKingJames and J.Cole photo credit: Ronica Bey
Jay Electronica & J.Cole photo credit: Ronica Bey
Jay Electronica & J.Cole photo credit: Ronica Bey
Young Jeezy spotted in the crowd + F.O.I   photo credit: Ronica Bey
Young Jeezy spotted in the crowd + F.O.I photo credit: Ronica Bey
Photo credit: Ronica Bey
Photo credit: Ronica Bey
Rapper Common  photo credit: Ronica Bey
Rapper Common photo credit: Ronica Bey
Photo credit: Ronica Bey
Photo credit: Ronica Bey
Photo credit: Ronica Bey
Photo credit: Ronica Bey
Early crowd photo      photo credit: Ronica Bey
Early crowd photo photo credit: Ronica Bey
Photo credit: Ronica Bey
Photo credit: Ronica Bey

Aboriginal delegates from around the globe as well as a million or so people and celebrities gatherered at the National Mall in Washington, D.C. on 10*10*15 to support the Honorable Minister of the Nation Of Islam & The Million Man March 20th anniversary. The theme of unity was present as well as united opposition against globe white supremacy and injustuce in America. Ironically, other than CSPAN and TV One no other major media outlets were present to cover this truly historic event.

By Aboriginal Excellence, Sep 15 2015 05:47PM

A Personal Reflection Of Colorism In Black Society by Ronica Bey
A Personal Reflection Of Colorism In Black Society by Ronica Bey

My family’s heritage reflects deep southern roots as well as indigenous Native American, Caribbean (Belize) and African ancestry. My maternal great grandmother was full-blood Native of Cheraw/Yamassee and Seminole ancestry. She passed away when I was three or four years old and I have very vague memories of her.



However, my mother spent a lot of time with her grandmother. Although not solely responsible, she is attributed with propagandizing colorism based on insecurities within my mother’s generation of the family. I’ve heard stories of her being more favorable toward her lighter skinned grandchildren. Luckily, I was able to escape my childhood without a color complex, where many women of color are not so lucky.